Carbon dating nuclear

As long as an organism is alive, the amount of C-14 in its cellular structure remains constant.

I have read sources that place this limit anywhere between 50 and 500 years.I have read that this difficulty in the young-sample range is due to the fact that not enough material has been depleted to calculate accurately.The method is known as bomb pulse dating and owes its efficacy to the large amount of $^$C that entered the atmosphere as a result of the testing of nuclear weapons.The $^$C atmospheric abundance peaked in the early to mid-1960s at around twice the longer-term average and has since declined pseudo-exponentially with an e-folding time of around 15 years.It then takes the same amount of time for half the remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and the same amount of time for half of those remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and so on. The amount of time it takes for one-half of a sample to decay is called the half-life of the isotope, and it’s given the symbol: It’s important to realize that the half-life decay of radioactive isotopes is not linear.

For example, you can’t find the remaining amount of an isotope as 7.5 half-lives by finding the midpoint between 7 and 8 half-lives.It can’t be used to determine the age of a moon rock or a meteorite.For nonliving substances, scientists use other isotopes, such as potassium-40.I am a paintings conservator and have been requested to examine a panel painting from approximately 1550 A.D., and I have dendrochronological evidence which supports this date.Carbon-14 (C-14), a radioactive isotope of carbon, is produced in the upper atmosphere by cosmic radiation.